Teaching with Social Media

This guide is also available in PDF format.

This guide provides an overview of teaching with social media at the University of Toronto. Its goal is to help Instructors:

  • understand considerations around the use of educational technologies and social media in teaching
  • explore best practices for the use of a variety of social media platforms
  • consider how to best integrate social media use into one’s teaching.

Many of the considerations we take into account when using educational technologies also apply when we are considering using social media in the classroom.  For a broad overview on educational technologies, see Engaging Students Online and Planning Online Learning.

Note: See U of T Guidelines on Teaching with Social Media for more information

The use of social media services and applications that are not supported by the University such as Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, and blogging platforms such as Blogger, Tumblr, Medium, Squarespace, etc., must follow university guidelines and policies.

If you would like to use social media services and applications in your course that are not included in U of T’s supported educational technologies catalogue, please review our recommended guidelines on the use of Tools Beyond the Portal. These guidelines cover various aspects of decision-making such as when to select alternatives to institutional tools, accountability and reduction of risk.

Key Questions
You will find prompts throughout this guide with suggested activities. These activities are meant to help you in your decision-making process as you learn about and plan for the use of social media in your teaching.

Overview of Social Media

  • Why Use Social Media in Teaching?

Benefits and Challenges of Using Social Media in the Classroom

Best Practices Examples: Twitter and Blogs

Integrating Social Media into Teaching and Learning

Considerations for Selecting and Using Educational Technologies

U of T Guidelines on Teaching with Social Media

Support, Resources and References