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Symposium-Express: Integrating the Classroom and Society Across Disciplines

December 8 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Details

Date:
December 8
Time:
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Description

Symposium Express workshops feature facilitators from the 11th Annual Teaching & Learning Symposium. This series spotlights sessions run at the Symposium, allowing our community to attend and engage with sessions they may have missed on the day.

ETHICS FOR FUTURE FINANCIAL PROFESSIONALS – STRATEGIES TO INCORPORATE ETHICS EDUCATION INTO A TECHNICAL CURRICULUM

Vicki Zhang, Assistant Professor, Teaching Stream, Statistical Sciences

Ethics has long been recognized as an important component in financial education. However, much of the ethics concern in modern finance increasingly dwell in “grey areas”, beyond the traditional boundaries of legality and professional standards, which have been the focus of traditional financial ethics education. Moral hazard created by complex products, “creative” risk transfer schemes that are legal but morally dubious, morality underlying common risk selection criteria, are just a few of such examples. I argue that it is high time we broadened the scope of financial ethics education to include those controversial topics, as they reflect the real-life issues our students will face in their future professional lives.

A key challenge is how to confront students’ indifference to financial ethics education, as they tend to be driven by external motivations when entering finance-related majors. Over the past three years, I developed a series of pedagogical strategies to incorporate ethics into technical courses. Examples include team-based research projects that utilize finance to address “externalities” such as environmental issues; “investigative” projects where students act as consumers in a real marketplace to understand the public’s challenges in the face of financial industry’s lack of transparency. A narrative-based approach is used in a second-year introductory course to implicitly convey the moral background of technical content. Students in my upper-year courses are required to read deeply on ethics issues and debate on controversial topics. I will present findings from exit reviews and lessons learned on how to integrate ethics as a key component into technical courses.

References:
Boatright, J.R. (2013). Ethics in finance. Chichester: Wiley Blackwell.
Ethical Issues in Financial Services. (n.d.). Issues in Business Ethics Contemporary Reflections on Business Ethics, 187-205. doi:10.1007/978-1-4020-4984-2_11
Zhang, V. & Ewener, J. (2014). Uncalculated Risks: The transformation of insurance, the erosion of regulation, and the economic and social consequences. Toronto: Canadian Scholar Press

FORGING LINKS BETWEEN THE CLASSROOM AND SOCIETY: STUDENT-DESIGNED OUTREACH ACTIVITIES ENHANCE LEARNING IN BIOLOGY

Aarthi Ashok, Associate Professor, Teaching Stream, Biological Sciences, UTSC
Trisha Mahtani, Teaching Assistant, Biological Sciences, UTSC and Ph.D. candidate, Cell & Systems Biology Graduate Program

Undergraduate biology students, much like many established scientists, are acutely aware of the importance of public support of and interest in scientific research in today’s society. Some former students have vocalized the importance of communicating biological concepts, especially those of relevance to public health, to young adults who may never pursue a degree in biology or indeed higher education. Inspired by these student voices and other scientific opinions that strongly advocate for the role of public outreach in the development of budding scientists (e.g. (1), (2)), we designed a pilot outreach activity in a 4th year course entitled Pathobiology of Human Disease. Our primary goal was for students to use their advanced knowledge of biological processes to develop an interactive and informative activity for a non-expert audience (e.g. young adults, kindergarteners, seniors in a continuing education course) that would empower our students to utilize and reflect on their course based learning. Students developed both an in-class presentation as well as a written description of their outreach activity which included learning goals, a listing of required materials, details on how the activity was conducted and means by which they would measure participant learning. Importantly, students also reported on what they learned as they designed this activity. We present examples of student work to highlight the important learning gains for students in this assignment as well as to engage instructors across disciplines in a broader discussion of authentic assignments that that forge links between the classroom and society.

References:
Aalbers CJ, Groen JL, Sivapalaratnam S. 2010. More outreach for young scientists. Nature 467:401-401)
Varner J. 2014. Scientific outreach: Toward effective public engagement with biological science. Bioscience 64:333-340

December 8, 2017
12pm-1pm
CTSI, Blackburn Room
Robarts Library, 4th Floor

Venue

Blackburn Room
130 St. George Street, 4th Floor
Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A5
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Website:
http://www.teaching.utoronto.ca